February 1, 2018

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What is USB Type C?

February 1, 2018

USB-C, also known as Type-C, is the latest connector developed by the USB Implementers' Forum (USB-IF), a group of industry leaders within the consumer electronics community, such as Apple, Intel, Dell. As many of the world's most recognized manufacturers are supporting this new technology, it is likely to be widely adopted. With such support, USB-C will gradually replace previous USB types, including USB-A, USB-B and USB Mini-B. Plus, as future devices are equipped with the new USB-C port, which is smaller than its predecessors, it's likely these devices will also be thinner and lighter than ever before.

 

WHAT DOES A USB-C OR TYPE-C CABLE LOOK LIKE?
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
The USB-C cable head is smaller than before, and looks a bit like a Micro-USB connector.
 
Eventually this is the USB connector you'll use with your devices instead of using your existing USB-A, Micro-B, USB-Mini, or Lightning cable
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Performance
 
It's really, really fast. 
USB-C can transfer data at up to 10Gbps (gigabits per second). Or an entire high definition feature-length movie in just 30 seconds. That's up to 20 times faster than USB2.0.
More power. 
With up to 100 watts, or 3 amps of power, USB-C cables can power almost anything. From laptops to large high-resolution monitors, even some printers. The 4K Ultra HD experience. 
USB-C cables can deliver Ultra-HD 4K video resolution to USB-C and HDMI displays. That's 4 times the resolution of standard high definition.
 
 

USB-C, USB PD, and Power Delivery

The USB PD specification is also closely intertwined with USB Type-C. Currently, a USB 2.0 connection provides up to 2.5 watts of power—enough to charge your phone or tablet, but that’s about it. The USB PD specification supported by USB-C ups this power delivery to 100 watts. It’s bi-directional, so a device can either send or receive power. And this power can be transferred at the same time the device is transmitting data across the connection. This kind of power delivery could even let you charge a laptop, which usually requires up to about 60 watts.

 
Apple’s new MacBook and Google’s new Chromebook Pixel both use their USB-C ports as their charging ports. USB-C could spell the end of all those proprietary laptop charging cables, with everything charging via a standard USB connection. You could even charge your laptop from one of those portable battery packs you charge your smartphones and other portable devices from today. You could plug your laptop into an external display connected to a power cable, and that external display would charge your laptop as you used it as an external display — all via the one little USB Type-C connection.
 
USB Type-C is a worthy upgrade. It’s making waves on the newer MacBooks and some mobile devices, but it’s not an Apple- or mobile-only technology. As time goes on, USB-C will appear in more and more devices of all types. USB-C may even replace the Lightning connector on Apple’s iPhones and iPads one day. Lightning doesn’t have many advantages over USB Type-C besides being a proprietary standard Apple can charge licensing fees for. Imagine a day when your Android-using friends need a charge and you don’t have to give the sorrowful “Sorry, I’ve just got an iPhone charger” line!
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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